Upcoming Webinars

February 25

Using the Best Practices Directory of Resources

February 28

Hearing Rhythm, the Key to Speaking English Fluently

March 4

An Inter-Culturally Sensitive Approach to Address ‘The Issue’ of Plagiarism

March 25

Teaching Intercultural Awareness and Communication

March 28

Language Barrier and its Cognitive Consequences in the Workplace and Education

 


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Using the Best Practices Directory of Resources

Best PracticesWhen: February 25, 2018 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Presenter: Judith Bond, OCELT

Webinar Description:

Do you ever run out of ESL teaching ideas? Do you wish you could add a new thematic area to your curriculum? Are you ever asked to supply teach with no notice? If so, this webinar may be of interest to you.

This webinar will introduce the Best Practices Directory of Resources, which is a carefully curated database of resources that have met carefully designed best practice criteria.

This database has been designed with the busy practitioner in mind, including:

  • an experienced instructor seeking professional learning or additional thematic resources
  • a new instructor looking to find essential documents and resources to get started
  • a supply instructor seeking activities for a class they’ll be teaching in two hours!
  • administrators looking for curricula or programming models

Join us at this webinar to learn how to use the site to your advantage. Computer users of all skill levels are welcome.

Presenter bio: 
Judith Bond, OCELT, has taught ELT at Sheridan College for the past 10 years. In addition, she has consulted on a number of projects as an Occupation Language Analysis writer and coach. Judith has worked on benchmarking occupations for second language speakers, and is a writer/developer of the new national Literacy/ESL Benchmark document as well as a writer researcher on the project.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/judith-bond-491b8911/

 

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This webinar is part of the Best Practices webinar series. This series is funded by the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration (MCI) and will be supporting a directory of best practices that are currently under development.

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Hearing Rhythm, the Key to Speaking English Fluently

PronunciationWhen: February 28, 2018 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Presenter: Jacqueline Johnson, OCELT

Webinar Description:

Do you struggle with finding an effective way to teach pronunciation? Are you looking for ways to teach stress in pronunciation? If so, this webinar may be for you.

If you are a pronunciation teacher, the following questions are probably rolling around in your students’ heads, although they may not be fluently dropping out of their mouths.

What do you mean LISTEN? I’m a visual learner. Can you please write it on the board?

Do I really have to talk in pronunciation class?

Can’t you see, I’m nodding my head? Of course, I’m listening.

Can you speak slowly, teacher?

You, on the other hand, are probably asking yourself how many more times you can teach the “th” sound and “ed” endings with that inane understanding smile we use for exercises in futility. You may also be asking yourself, “Why can’t I understand a word that Level 7 student is saying?”

The simple answer to all of this is that stress is vital to comprehensible speech, and learning the rhythm of English is the key to speech. This webinar offers a more satisfying answer. It delves into how a pronunciation pilot program at St. George’s ESL Centre in Guelph went about developing and implementing an auditory approach to teaching this aspect of pronunciation.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • why stress is hard to teach visually
  • how teaching auditorily can make your classroom safer 
  • an auditory and visual sound formula for teaching stress described by students as "the BOMbas and baBOMs"
  • how to use the BOMba Spelling Dictionary, a tool adapted specifically for integrating stress awareness into teaching writing and speaking skills
  • how to heighten awareness of how to listen for stress, using adaptations of the classic dictogloss
  • how to incorporate listening for stress as part of testing for PBLA speaking and listening, Levels 3-9

You will be given a sample CLB Level 9 class lesson outline, complete with a PBLA task that can be adapted for use and testing for CLB Levels 3 to 9.

Presenter bio: 
Jacqueline Johnson MA, OCELT, has taught ESL for the past 15 years. She is the lead pronunciation teacher at St. George’s Centre for ESL in Guelph, a position she has held since 2012. She specializes in pronunciation and oral skill development for ESL learners. She has taught all LINC and ESL levels, from basic literacy to Level 8/9, as well as advanced academic at Renison University College in Waterloo.

Jacqueline brings extensive experience in innovative curriculum design in language and life skill development for a diverse range of clientele. She is a visual, kinesthetic learner. In her spare time, Jacqueline hates listening to jazz, however being married to a jazz aficionado eventually forced her to come to terms with auditory learning, and in the course of learning how to distinguish the sound of a trumpet from that of a saxophone, stumbled across the insights that underlie hearing rhythm.

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An Inter-Culturally Sensitive Approach to Address ‘The Issue’ of Plagiarism

PlagiarismWhen: March 4, 2018 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Presenter: Dr. Marlon Valencia

Webinar Description:

Do you find plagiarism to be a recurrent issue when teaching advanced English language learners (ELLs) academic essay writing? Have you noticed your students repeating their mistakes after you spent hours giving them feedback on their first essay/rough draft?

The presenter found these two situations recurrently happening with his advanced ELLs every time they had to write academic essays. This prompted him to review the topic of plagiarism and learn about diverse perspectives on it from empirical research. He did this in order to understand why his efforts seemed to have little impact among his international students.

This webinar aims to achieve the following goals:

  • Share the presenter’s motivations to learn more about this topic
  • Discuss what he learned about academic writing and plagiarism from non-Western perspectives
  • Present some ideas on how cultural differences and similarities could be unpacked in the advanced English for Academic Purposes (EAP) classroom
  • Share how what he learned led to an intervention in his advanced ESL class
  • Invite the audience to discuss the ideas introduced in this presentation and collaborate by adding their thoughts

The topics of grammar and academic writing will be covered as they relate to advanced level English language learners.

Presenter bio: 
Dr. Marlon Valencia, OCELT, is a lecturer in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, as well as the Chang School of Continuing Education at Ryerson University. He is also an ESL professor at Sheridan College.

He is an experienced ESL and Spanish instructor and has taught diverse learners in North and South America. His research interests include language learners’ and teachers’ identities, language politics, and multiliteracies.

His recently completed doctoral dissertation focuses on the role of imagination in facilitating future language teachers’ development of their professional identities as they complete their teacher preparation programs in Canada, Chile, and Colombia.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-marlon-valencia-0517643a/

 

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This webinar is part of the Best Practices webinar series. This series is funded by the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration (MCI) and will be supporting a directory of best practices that are currently under development.

Register



 

* Tutela account required before registering


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Teaching Intercultural Awareness and Communication

Intercultural AwarenessWhen: March 25, 2018 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Presenter: Yecid Ortega

Webinar Description:

This webinar aims to encourage ESL teachers to understand what intercultural competence and cultural awareness are and how to use various activities in the classroom to foster understanding of other cultures and languages.

Cultural awareness is the sensitivity that individuals have towards the impact of culturally induced-behaviour on language use and communication (Tomalin & Stempleski, 1993). It is the ability to understand life, values, beliefs, attitudes and feelings from other cultures while intercultural competence is “the ability to communicate effectively and appropriately in intercultural situations based on one’s intercultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes” (Deardorff, 2004, p. 194). In other words, individuals are first sensitive to other cultural differences and then learn the necessary skills to communicate and behave according to specific contexts (Deardorff, 2009).

As English language educators who work with diverse students, we learn and understand the various nuances of cultures, our work is to translate that cultural knowledge into the classroom pedagogy. This webinar will discuss possibilities for classroom practices and experiences on how to set up the groundwork for meaningful hands-on lessons that raises students’ cultural awareness in such topics as cultural stereotypes, values, attitudes and behaviours.

The four objectives of the webinar are to:

  1. present the audience with definitions of cultural awareness and intercultural competence as well as their importance for the language classroom,
  2. provide the benefits of infusing lessons with intercultural components
  3. showcase possible lessons that can be implemented in any ESL classroom context; and
  4. highlight some resources for educators.


References
Deardorff, D. K. (2004). The identification and assessment of intercultural competence as a student outcome of international education at institutions of higher education in the United States. Unpublished dissertation, North Carolina State University, Raleigh.
 
Deardorff, D. K. (2009). The SAGE Handbook of Intercultural Competence. SAGE Publications.

Tomalin, B., & Stempleski, S. (1993). Cultural Awareness. OUP Oxford.

Presenter bio:

Yecid is a Ph.D. student (he will be a candidate by the time the webinar takes place)  in the program of Languages and Literacies & Comparative, International, Development Education at OISE/University of Toronto with a vast international teacher training experience. He is interested in language teacher education and how social justice juxtaposes with concepts of plurilingualism in different TESOL national and international contexts.

LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/yecidortega
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ortegayecid
Web: https://www.andjustice4all.ca/

 

MCI Logo

    

This webinar is part of the Best Practices webinar series. This series is funded by the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration (MCI) and will be supporting a directory of best practices that are currently under development.

Register



 

* Tutela account required before registering


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Language Barrier and its Cognitive Consequences in the Workplace and Education

languagebarriersWhen: March 28, 2018 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Presenter: Edalat Shekari, OCELT

Webinar Description:

Using a non-dominant language in the English-only workplace and educational settings is a challenging issue for L2 learners.

In this webinar, the presenter will:

  • review some factors affecting language processing and performance in late adult bilinguals
  • present and discuss the results of some empirical studies on the cognitive consequences of following spoken instructions, information processing, and task-performance in a dominant and non-dominant language
  • suggest some ideas of how to help the bilinguals overcome the cognitive language barrier.

Presenter bio: 
Edalat Shekari is a last-year PhD candidate in the Department of Linguistics & Languages at McMaster University. His research focuses on bilingual language processing and using a dominant and non-dominant language in the workplace and education.

Edalat Shekari, OCELT, was a community college instructor (ESL, ESP, EAP) before moving to Canada in 2012.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/edalat-shekari-2a6b5588/

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